Set Up Your Own Home Perimeter Video Surveillance System

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Want to see who's knocking on your door before you answer it? Do you suspect your neighbors of harassing your dog while you're not home? Is someone secretly taking a dip in your Jacuzzi while you're on a weekend getaway? With a home perimeter video surveillance system, you'll be able to catch trespassers in the act, identify thieves or vandals, or simply see who is ringing your doorbell before you open your door. You can monitor surveillance feeds directly on your existing television sets, without the need for dedicated monitors. You can even tape surveillance activity with your VCR in case you need to present someone with irrefutable proof of wrongdoing. The best part is that installation of such a system is a lot easier than you think. Just follow these easy steps, and soon you'll enjoy a dual-camera video surveillance system and the peace of mind that goes along with it. Equipment You Will Need: 2 Outdoor Video Cameras 1 Video Modulator 1 Splitter/Combiner 1 Low-Pass Filter Tools Required: Screwdriver Pliers Drill & drill bits Wire clips Hammer Other common hand tools Here's How to Do It Step 1: Select Cameras and Mounting Locations Start by choosing the type of video cameras you want to use and the locations where you'd like to mount them. Dual-camera surveillance systems are best suited to monitor the front and back of your home, or any other combination that you see fit (i.e. the front of your home and side entrance, etc.). You'll want to avoid any areas where the cameras will be subject to direct sun; sunlight can damage the equipment and impair a camera's visibility. The best location is typically under a roof eave or any other location where the sunlight won't directly hit the lens. When choosing mounting locations for the cameras, make sure that the distance between the camera and the video modulator inside (See Step 2) does not exceed the amount of cable you have for each camera. For example, if your camera comes with 100 feet of cable, and you want to mount the camera 150 feet away from the modulator, you'll need to purchase an optional extension kit (sold separately). Two main specifications to look for with surveillance video cameras are lux (light sensitivity) and the lines of resolution. The lux rating is the amount of light required to obtain an image. One lux is approximately the light from one candle at one meter. Black & white cameras have lower lux ratings than color cameras, making them perform better at night. The number of lines determines the resolution of the camera. Higher resolution makes it easier to distinguish fine details and recognize people at a distance. Most standard TVs and VCRs have resolutions of less than 300 lines. To install your cameras, use the camera brackets to mount them in the area you selected (make sure no components are plugged into power sources at the time of installation). Mount the cameras facing the direction you'd like to monitor. It's okay to approximate for now; you'll have an opportunity to fine tune the camera positioning and focus once everything has been connected. 7544BNN Submersible B&W Tube Camera (Recommended) One of our most popular models, this camera is perfect for monitoring exterior locations. The black & white, 3.6mm-lens camera comes in a rugged weatherproof aluminum casing, provides up to 420 lines of resolution, and can detect images with as little as .01 lux. The camera comes complete with 100 feet of cable and the AC power supply. 7544BN Weatherproof Tube Camera with Audio (Optional) This model offers the same features as the 7544BNN and adds a built-in microphone to capture sound as well as video. Camera detects images with as little as .05 lux. The camera also includes 100 feet of cable and the AC power supply. 7544CNN Submersible Color Tube Camera (Optional) This model is the color version of the 7544BNN, offering full-color video images. The camera provides up to 350 lines of resolution. Includes 100 feet of cable and the power supply. 7574MBS Miniature Weatherproof Bullet Camera (Optional) Smaller than the 7544BNN, this camera is ideal for discreet outdoor monitoring. It measures only 2.5 inches long and has a 1-inch lens. Resolution: 400 lines. Lux: 0.5. Requires 7544CBL 65-foot cable pack (sold separately). 7574MBP Miniature Pinhole Bullet Camera (Optional) For truly covert surveillance, the 7574MBP camera can be installed behind a one-inch hole. Camera dimensions: 1.8" x .75" Resolution: 420 lines. Lux: .03. Requires 7544CBL 65-foot cable pack (sold separately). 7680A B&W, 430-line C-Mount Camera (Optional) If you want a highly-visible black & white surveillance system to deter trespassers, vandals and other unwanted crooks, a C-mount camera system is the solution for you. Requires lens, weatherproof aluminum outdoor housing and coaxial cable (each sold separately). 7682A Color, 570-line C-Mount Camera (Optional) If you want a highly-visible color surveillance system to deter trespassers and other unwanted elements, a C-mount camera system is the solution for you. Requires lens, weatherproof aluminum outdoor housing and coaxial cable (each sold separately). Step 2: Connect Cameras to the Modulator Next, you'll want to select a video modulator. Video modulators accept signals from separate video devices and then output the signals to dedicated TV channels of your choice. With a dual-camera surveillance system, for example, you can use a two-input modulator to send the video feed from the front camera to Channel 70 and the back camera feed to Channel 77 -- or whatever channels you prefer to assign them to. With a three-input modulator, you can program a third video source, like a satellite television system, VCR or DVD player, to be available for viewing on Channel 74. Make sure you keep the channels you create at least two channels from existing cable or UHF stations. Plus, you'll need one empty channel between your modulated channels. Each modulator has a specific range of channels to which the signals can be programmed. With the proper splitter/combiner (see Step 3), you'll be able to tune into your custom channels from any TV in your home, even from those that are nowhere near the video component itself. After mounting the cameras, you'll want to route the camera cables to the modulator, usually located at the cable or satellite system point of entry. Most cameras have separate video signal cables and power cables. Connect the video signal cables to the inputs of the modulator, and connect the power cables to a power source. Depending on your comfort and skill level, you may choose several methods of getting the camera cable inside your home. A few important rules to follow: don't run the cable alongside 120 AC wires and don't pull too hard on the wires as you install them. Most cable and satellite dish installers will simply run the cable along the outside of the home, securing the cable with wire clips. A hole is drilled in the wall for the cable to enter. You could certainly use this quick and simple method, but be sure to caulk the entry point of the cable to keep spiders and other uninvited guests out. A cleaner approach is to run the cable into your attic or basement, then "fish" the cable into a wall and out to the location where the modulator is located. 7702F 2-Input Modulator (Recommended) This modulator accepts two separate video camera feeds. It allows you to program dedicated television channels in the following range: UHF Ch. 14-78; UB Ch. 58-135. 7702B 3-Input Modulator with Stereo Audio Loop (Optional) This modulator accepts up to three video camera feeds. You can use it for viewing three cameras, or two cameras and any other video signal, like a satellite television system, VCR or DVD player. The Stereo Audio Loop function allows you to hear audio/video content in stereo rather than monaural (not applicable to surveillance cameras). This model allows you to program dedicated television channels in the following range: UHF Ch. 14-78; UB Ch. 58-135. Step 3: Use a Splitter/Combiner to Distribute Signals to Other TVs Now that you've set up the cameras and modulators, you'll probably want to integrate a splitter/combiner into your system. The unit takes signals from the modulator and distributes them up to eight different TVs. This allows you to watch your video surveillance channels from virtually any TV in your home. Using standard coaxial cable, connect the modulator's output to the splitter/combiner's input. Connect each of the Splitter/Combiner's outputs to every television in your home from which you'd like to monitor surveillance feeds. existing system Typical Existing System system with modulator System with Modulator" 7810C4 Three-way Splitter (Recommended) Lets you send surveillance camera signals from the modulator to up to three TVs in your home. 7810C2 Two-way Splitter (Optional) Lets you send surveillance camera signals from the modulator to two TVs in your home. 7810C4 Four-way Splitter (Optional) Lets you send surveillance camera signals from the modulator to up to four TVs in your home. 7810C6 Six-way Splitter (Optional) Lets you send surveillance camera signals from the modulator to up to six TVs in your home. 7810C8 Eight-way Splitter (Optional) Lets you send surveillance camera signals from the modulator to up to eight TVs in your home. Step 4: Install a Low-Pass Filter Because coaxial cable distributes signals in both directions, you'll need a low-pass filter if you plan on linking your surveillance system to your existing cable service. A low-pass filter prevents your modulated signals from being delivered to any external sources -- like your neighbor's cable system. It also cleans up the channel where your modulated signal will be inserted. Many cable companies are now using empty channels for Internet services and other functions. Connect the filter at the cable system's primary point of entry into the home. installing a low pass filter Installing a Low Pass Filter 7822D Low-Pass Filter (Recommended) This panel blocks cable television channels less than 121 and off-air channels 65-69. 7822 Low-Pass Filter (Optional) This panel blocks cable television channels less than 50 and off-air channels 14-69. 7822B Low-Pass Filter (Optional) This panel blocks cable television channels less than 64 and off-air channels 18-69. 7822C Low-Pass Filter (Optional) This panel blocks cable television channels less than 86 and off-air channels 40-69. Step 5: Focus, Fine Tune and Record Once everything has been hooked up, power up the system and select the video mode that matches the inputs to which the cameras are connected. Use the image on your television to help guide you when it comes to focusing and adjusting the camera to provide optimum clarity. Because you've created two dedicated television channels for your video surveillance system, simply use your VCR to tape those channels if you want to catch any suspicious activity on tape. For long-term taping, check out our time-lapse VCR that can tape up to 960 hours of surveillance on a single tape. 7729RR Real-Time/Time-Lapse VCR



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