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teancum
Starting Member

3 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2010 :  10:47:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm a noob to installing cable wiring, but because we are going to start finishing the basement soon I decided to install cat6 outlets in each room while it's easy. Currently I have planned to install 2 cat6 jacks and 2 phone jacks in each room (2 phone because the cable can take it...and why not...even if it's a little extra). I've run cable to 2 rooms to start with, to make sure everything is working correctly, but I think I've run into a snag. Essentially I'm doing home run wiring to a central location in the basement where I will put the cable modem and the router (currently an old linksys, with a new netgear on the way) and switches (which I will add as needed). Everything is hooked up and I'm getting connectivity everywhere, but at about half the speed that I used to get. Prior to moving the modem and router downstairs with the new cabling I was getting about 8Mbps, but with the new setup it's around 4.
Initially when I installed the cables and was hooking everything up on the first cable I was using the T568B standard on both ends (the jack in the wall upstairs and the male jack on the other end to plug into the router), but I didn't get any signal. However, when I switch the male end to use the crossover standard I started getting a signal, but, as I said at about half the speed I was getting before.
So, what it comes down to is...did I wire something wrong, which is causing the slower speeds and/or did the cable need to be a crossover configuration?
Thanks in advance!

Tfitzpatri8
Administrator

USA
8263 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2010 :  1:06:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Standard Cat 5e components were designed for gigabit Ethernet networks, well in excess of the 4-8 you are getting from your Internet provider. Unless you damaged the cable or really messed up the connections, you shouldn't have any trouble getting 8 Mb. The more likely scenario is that the wiring to the modem's new location isn't up to the task. Are we talking cable, dsl or wireless 3g/4g modem? Have you tested using a known-good Ethernet patch cord connecting a laptop pc directly to the modem, bypassing your Ethernet wiring and your router?

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teancum
Starting Member

3 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2010 :  2:27:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Our home came with a coax line running from the outside to near the circuit breaker box in the basement. When they installed the internet they hooked up a line from that and ran it to where the computer is. I've essentially just taken the cable modem (10/100, if I remember right) and screwed the original cord (coming from outside the house) directly to the modem (essentially just getting rid of the coax patch cable that they installed to put the modem close to the computer). So I would guess that the modem is actually getting a better signal now that it was before (one less connection). To test from the modem I've done the following:

1. I took a good patch (cat5 I believe) cord from the modem to my laptop and benchmarked it at that speed (using speedtest.net), figuring that was the fastest that it would likely get.
2. I then plugged that cat5 cord into my router and took another patch cord (cat6 that I made) and plugged it into one of the router ports. The result here was essentially identical to the result from step 1
3. I then ran upstairs and plugged the same laptop with the same cat6 patch cord into one of my ethernet plugs and ran the speed test a final time.

The first time I did this I got very different results (as outlined above about 1/2 the speed at the port than I did attached to the router/modem). However, as a result of your post I decided to do it again just to make sure and this time there was some lost speed, but not seriously significant. So, now it has me wondering if it was just a result of the time of day. This is my first time using cable internet, but it's my understanding that my speed is impact by what others are doing on the network...which makes me wonder if at during the time when I was coming upstairs someone else started downloading a large file or something and it seriously impacted my speed for the last test. I may try running this test again at some point in the near future just to validate my theory (unless you can do that for me). Hopefully that's the case. I know when I was pulling the cords that none of them were damaged, so it's mostly likely that if something is messed up it's one the male end that plugs into the router. Just to be sure...should those be wired as crossover cables (i.e. T568B on the jack end and the crossover T568A on the other end)?
Your help is greatly appreciated

Edited by - teancum on 12/28/2010 2:28:36 PM
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Tfitzpatri8
Administrator

USA
8263 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2010 :  3:00:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Your home network should connect your computers to your router via straight-through cables. It normally doesn't matter, though, since modern routers 'auto adapt' to the cable. Crossover cables were designed for use where you were connecting two destination devices directly instead of through a router or switch.

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Press2Esc
Junior Member

USA
33 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2010 :  3:08:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
next time you have see your drop in bandwidth, try "pinging" google (72.14.204.147) and a local computer (192.168.1.x) several times and look for major variations or dropped packets.

click START > at RUN window, enter "CMD". At black command window, enter the following commands...

ping 72.14.204.147 -l 1400 -n 15 (note: minus l=packet size)
ping 192.168.x.x -l 1400 -n 15 (note: where x.x is the last 2 ip addresses on another system connected to your switch/router.

at each of the 2 ping "summaries", look for speed variation (min,max,avg) and dropped packets (% loss).

P2E
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teancum
Starting Member

3 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2010 :  3:40:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Tfitzpatri8, I may try and switch them back to a straight-through (because that makes more sense to me) when I finish everything off. Truthfully the only other time that I've used crossovers was when my brother and I would hook our laptops together to game, so it seemed weird to me that I would need them in crossover mode.

Thanks Press2Esc, I'll take your advice and start pinging in order to get a better idea of what might be going on, whether it's a provider issue or a local one.

Thanks again, I appreciate the help...hopefully I can now concentrate on running the rest of the cable and drilling holes in walls!
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